Arizona

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Arizona, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Arizona can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Arizona can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

The bank must mail or deliver a copy of the notice to the homeowner within five days after recording the notice of default, and post a sale notice in a conspicuous public location, as well as the superior court of the county 20 days before the sale. The sale notice must also be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in a local newspaper prior to the auction date.

Reinstatement and Redemption

The mortgage can be reinstated up to 5 p.m. on the last day before the sale date, unless it is a Saturday or a legal holiday. The property cannot be redeemed after a nonjudicial foreclosure.

Arizona Protections for Service Members

Arizona law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Banks may not foreclose on service members when the military duties prevent them from being represented in court.

Deficiency Law

The state allows banks to request a deficiency judgment from the court within 90 days after a nonjudicial foreclosure sale. If the property is under 2.5 acres and a single one or two-family home, it is exempt from deficiency judgments.

Eviction Notice

The buyer of the foreclosed home must deliver a notice to vacate to the homeowner prior to starting the eviction process.

For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Arizona, visit HUD.gov.

Arizona

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Arizona, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Arizona can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Arizona can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

The bank must mail or deliver a copy of the notice to the homeowner within five days after recording the notice of default, and post a sale notice in a conspicuous public location, as well as the superior court of the county 20 days before the sale. The sale notice must also be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in a local newspaper prior to the auction date.

Reinstatement and Redemption

The mortgage can be reinstated up to 5 p.m. on the last day before the sale date, unless it is a Saturday or a legal holiday. The property cannot be redeemed after a nonjudicial foreclosure.

Arizona Protections for Service Members

Arizona law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Banks may not foreclose on service members when the military duties prevent them from being represented in court.

Deficiency Law

The state allows banks to request a deficiency judgment from the court within 90 days after a nonjudicial foreclosure sale. If the property is under 2.5 acres and a single one or two-family home, it is exempt from deficiency judgments.

Eviction Notice

The buyer of the foreclosed home must deliver a notice to vacate to the homeowner prior to starting the eviction process.

For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Arizona, visit HUD.gov.

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