Connecticut

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Connecticut, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Connecticut can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Nonjudicial foreclosures are not allowed in Connecticut.

Foreclosure Notification

After the public trustee receives the foreclosure notice, they will set a sale date that is no less than 110 days and no more than 125 days from the notice recording date. In certain cases, homeowners may delay foreclosure for up to 90 days. Within 15 days of submitting the foreclosure notice the bank must serve the homeowner with a foreclosure notice, as well as deferment information, or post it on their property. The public trustee must send a Notice of Sale and Right to Cure and to the borrower on two separate occasions and publish a notice in a local newspaper.

Reinstatement and Redemption

The homeowner cannot file an intent to cure the default unless the mortgage contract provides this right or the foreclosing party permits it, however a homeowner can redeem in a strict foreclosure in which the court will set a specific date, known as a Law Day, which is the last date that the borrower can redeem the home.

Connecticut Protections for Service Members

Connecticut law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Banks may not foreclose on service members in active duty.

Deficiency Law

The bank can get a deficiency judgment against the homeowner in a foreclosure by sale. However, if the property sells for less than the appraised value, the bank must credit the homeowner with one-half the difference between the selling price and the appraised value.

Eviction Notice

The buyer of the foreclosed home must give the homeowner notice before initiating can the formal eviction process in court. If not, state marshals may remove the homeowner

For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Connecticut, visit HUD.gov.

Connecticut

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Connecticut, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Connecticut can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Nonjudicial foreclosures are not allowed in Connecticut.

Foreclosure Notification

After the public trustee receives the foreclosure notice, they will set a sale date that is no less than 110 days and no more than 125 days from the notice recording date. In certain cases, homeowners may delay foreclosure for up to 90 days. Within 15 days of submitting the foreclosure notice the bank must serve the homeowner with a foreclosure notice, as well as deferment information, or post it on their property. The public trustee must send a Notice of Sale and Right to Cure and to the borrower on two separate occasions and publish a notice in a local newspaper.

Reinstatement and Redemption

The homeowner cannot file an intent to cure the default unless the mortgage contract provides this right or the foreclosing party permits it, however a homeowner can redeem in a strict foreclosure in which the court will set a specific date, known as a Law Day, which is the last date that the borrower can redeem the home.

Connecticut Protections for Service Members

Connecticut law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Banks may not foreclose on service members in active duty.

Deficiency Law

The bank can get a deficiency judgment against the homeowner in a foreclosure by sale. However, if the property sells for less than the appraised value, the bank must credit the homeowner with one-half the difference between the selling price and the appraised value.

Eviction Notice

The buyer of the foreclosed home must give the homeowner notice before initiating can the formal eviction process in court. If not, state marshals may remove the homeowner

For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Connecticut, visit HUD.gov.

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