Maryland

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Maryland, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Maryland can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Maryland can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

Maryland law requires the three notices:

  • The bank must send a notice of intent to foreclose at least 45 days before the bank initiates foreclosure proceedings. The notice has to include a loss mitigation application and mediation information.
  • The bank begins the foreclosure by filing an Order to Docket with the court and serving a copy to the homeowner with other documents, such as a foreclosure mediation request form.
  • The bank must publish a notice of sale in a local newspaper for three weeks and send a notice to the homeowner ten to thirty days before the sale. After the end of the redemption period, the bank must publish a notice of sale in a local newspaper for three weeks. The also has to send a notice of sale to all parties present at the foreclosure action 30 days before the sale.

Maryland Foreclosure Protections

Maryland law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Maryland law also provides to members of the state national guard or Maryland Defense Force ordered active duty for 14 days or more.

Reinstatement and Redemption

Maryland law allows the homeowner to reinstate the loan up to one business day before the foreclosure sale.

There is no post-foreclosure right to redeem in Maryland, but the homeowner has up until the court confirms the foreclosure sale to redeem the home.

Deficiency Law

Maryland does not have an anti-deficiency law, yet after the court confirms the sale, a court appointed auditor will decide how to distribute the sale proceeds and submit a report. If the proceeds are not enough to cover the mortgage debt, the bank has three years to file a motion for a deficiency judgment.

Eviction Notice

In Maryland, the new owners will receive an order of possession from the court after the sale after which they may evict the former homeowners. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Maryland, visit HUD.gov.

Maryland

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Maryland, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Maryland can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Maryland can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

Maryland law requires the three notices:

  • The bank must send a notice of intent to foreclose at least 45 days before the bank initiates foreclosure proceedings. The notice has to include a loss mitigation application and mediation information.
  • The bank begins the foreclosure by filing an Order to Docket with the court and serving a copy to the homeowner with other documents, such as a foreclosure mediation request form.
  • The bank must publish a notice of sale in a local newspaper for three weeks and send a notice to the homeowner ten to thirty days before the sale. After the end of the redemption period, the bank must publish a notice of sale in a local newspaper for three weeks. The also has to send a notice of sale to all parties present at the foreclosure action 30 days before the sale.

Maryland Foreclosure Protections

Maryland law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Maryland law also provides to members of the state national guard or Maryland Defense Force ordered active duty for 14 days or more.

Reinstatement and Redemption

Maryland law allows the homeowner to reinstate the loan up to one business day before the foreclosure sale.

There is no post-foreclosure right to redeem in Maryland, but the homeowner has up until the court confirms the foreclosure sale to redeem the home.

Deficiency Law

Maryland does not have an anti-deficiency law, yet after the court confirms the sale, a court appointed auditor will decide how to distribute the sale proceeds and submit a report. If the proceeds are not enough to cover the mortgage debt, the bank has three years to file a motion for a deficiency judgment.

Eviction Notice

In Maryland, the new owners will receive an order of possession from the court after the sale after which they may evict the former homeowners. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Maryland, visit HUD.gov.

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