New Hampshire

For homeowners facing foreclosure in New Hampshire, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in New Hampshire can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in New Hampshire can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

New Hampshire law requires one notice:

  • In New Hampshire, defaulting homeowners will receive a notice of sale, which must be personally served or mailed the defaulting homeowner by the bank at least 45 days before the sale. The notice of sale also has to be published in a newspaper once a week for three weeks before the sale.

New Hampshire Foreclosure Protections

New Hampshire law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

New Hampshire law also provides to members of the state guard, national guard, or militia called to active duty by the governor for over 30 days.

Reinstatement and Redemption

New Hampshire law does not allow the homeowner to reinstate prior to the foreclosure sale. The mortgage contract, though, may allow reinstatement or the bank may allow the homeowner to reinstate.

New Hampshire law does not allow homeowners to redeem after the foreclosure, though the homeowner can redeem up until the time of the foreclosure sale by paying off the full amount of the unpaid mortgage debt.

Deficiency Law

In New Hampshire, the bank can request a deficiency judgment, though it must try to obtain a fair and reasonable price at the sale.

Eviction Notice

After a New Hampshire foreclosure sale, the buyer must give the homeowner a 30-day notice to leave before starting eviction proceedings in court. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in New Hampshire, visit HUD.gov.

New Hampshire

For homeowners facing foreclosure in New Hampshire, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in New Hampshire can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in New Hampshire can also be nonjudicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

New Hampshire law requires one notice:

  • In New Hampshire, defaulting homeowners will receive a notice of sale, which must be personally served or mailed the defaulting homeowner by the bank at least 45 days before the sale. The notice of sale also has to be published in a newspaper once a week for three weeks before the sale.

New Hampshire Foreclosure Protections

New Hampshire law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

New Hampshire law also provides to members of the state guard, national guard, or militia called to active duty by the governor for over 30 days.

Reinstatement and Redemption

New Hampshire law does not allow the homeowner to reinstate prior to the foreclosure sale. The mortgage contract, though, may allow reinstatement or the bank may allow the homeowner to reinstate.

New Hampshire law does not allow homeowners to redeem after the foreclosure, though the homeowner can redeem up until the time of the foreclosure sale by paying off the full amount of the unpaid mortgage debt.

Deficiency Law

In New Hampshire, the bank can request a deficiency judgment, though it must try to obtain a fair and reasonable price at the sale.

Eviction Notice

After a New Hampshire foreclosure sale, the buyer must give the homeowner a 30-day notice to leave before starting eviction proceedings in court. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in New Hampshire, visit HUD.gov.

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