Ohio

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Ohio, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Ohio can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Nonjudicial foreclosures are not allowed in Ohio.

Foreclosure Notification

Ohio law requires one foreclosure notice:

  • In Ohio, the bank files a foreclosure lawsuit to begin the foreclosure process and gives the homeowner notice of the suit by serving them with a summons and complaint. The homeowner has 28 days after being served to file a response to the complaint. The homeowner can also request mediation during this time. After the court grants a judgment for foreclosure in favor of the bank, the foreclosure sale process can begin. The bank will file a notice of sale with the court at least seven days before the foreclosure sale and send a copy to the homeowner. The notice of sale must also be published in a local newspaper for at least three consecutive weeks before the foreclosure sale.

Ohio Foreclosure Protections

Ohio law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Ohio also provides protections to national guard ordered by the governor into active service or training.

Reinstatement and Redemption

Ohio law does not allow the homeowner to reinstate before the foreclosure sale, but the terms of the mortgage contract may allow the homeowner to reinstate or the bank may agree to a reinstatement.

After a foreclosure sale in Ohio takes place, the court must confirm it. The homeowner has up until the court confirms the foreclosure sale to redeem the home.

Deficiency Law

In Ohio, the bank can request a deficiency judgment, which expires two years after the sale. Also, the home cannot be sold at the foreclosure sale for less than two thirds of its appraised value, limiting the deficiency amount.

Eviction Notice

After the court confirms the foreclosure sale, the new homeowner can ask the court for a writ of possession and have the sheriff remove the foreclosed homeowners from the home. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Ohio, visit HUD.gov.

Ohio

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Ohio, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Ohio can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Nonjudicial foreclosures are not allowed in Ohio.

Foreclosure Notification

Ohio law requires one foreclosure notice:

  • In Ohio, the bank files a foreclosure lawsuit to begin the foreclosure process and gives the homeowner notice of the suit by serving them with a summons and complaint. The homeowner has 28 days after being served to file a response to the complaint. The homeowner can also request mediation during this time. After the court grants a judgment for foreclosure in favor of the bank, the foreclosure sale process can begin. The bank will file a notice of sale with the court at least seven days before the foreclosure sale and send a copy to the homeowner. The notice of sale must also be published in a local newspaper for at least three consecutive weeks before the foreclosure sale.

Ohio Foreclosure Protections

Ohio law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Ohio also provides protections to national guard ordered by the governor into active service or training.

Reinstatement and Redemption

Ohio law does not allow the homeowner to reinstate before the foreclosure sale, but the terms of the mortgage contract may allow the homeowner to reinstate or the bank may agree to a reinstatement.

After a foreclosure sale in Ohio takes place, the court must confirm it. The homeowner has up until the court confirms the foreclosure sale to redeem the home.

Deficiency Law

In Ohio, the bank can request a deficiency judgment, which expires two years after the sale. Also, the home cannot be sold at the foreclosure sale for less than two thirds of its appraised value, limiting the deficiency amount.

Eviction Notice

After the court confirms the foreclosure sale, the new homeowner can ask the court for a writ of possession and have the sheriff remove the foreclosed homeowners from the home. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Ohio, visit HUD.gov.

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