Washington

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Washington, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Washington can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in washington can also be non judicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

Washington law requires three foreclosure notices:

  • Before initiating the foreclosure process, the bank must contact the homeowner to inform them about the opportunity to meet with the bank to try to work out an alternative to the foreclosure.
  • To initiate the foreclosure process, the bank will send a notice of default to the homeowner, as well as post the notice in a visible place on the property, or personally serves the notice of default to the homeowner, 30 days before recording or serving a notice of sale.
  • At least 120 days, or in some cases 90 days, before the foreclosure sale, the bank will record a notice of sale the county recorder’s office, send a copy of the notice to the homeowner, and post the notice in a visible place on the property or serve the notice to the homeowner. The notice of sale will also be published in a local newspaper.

Washington Foreclosure Protections

Washington law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Washington law also provides protections to the National Guard or member of the military reserves.

Reinstatement and Redemption

In Washington, a homeowner can reinstate the loan at any time prior to the 11th day before the sale.

In Washington, a homeowner can’t redeem the home after a nonjuducial foreclosure.

Deficiency Law

In Washington, deficiency judgments are not allowed following nonjudicial foreclosures.

Eviction Notice

In Washington, the buyer is entitled to possession of the home on the 20th day after the foreclosure sale. If the foreclosed homeowners don’t leave, the buyer may file a lawsuit to evict them from the home. The buyer shall have a right to summary proceedings to obtain possession. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Washington, visit HUD.gov.

Washington

For homeowners facing foreclosure in Washington, the following is a summary of the state’s foreclosure laws:

Judicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in Washington can be judicial, meaning the bank must file a lawsuit in court in order to foreclose.

Nonjudicial Foreclosure

Foreclosures in washington can also be non judicial but a court must confirm the sale.

Foreclosure Notification

Washington law requires three foreclosure notices:

  • Before initiating the foreclosure process, the bank must contact the homeowner to inform them about the opportunity to meet with the bank to try to work out an alternative to the foreclosure.
  • To initiate the foreclosure process, the bank will send a notice of default to the homeowner, as well as post the notice in a visible place on the property, or personally serves the notice of default to the homeowner, 30 days before recording or serving a notice of sale.
  • At least 120 days, or in some cases 90 days, before the foreclosure sale, the bank will record a notice of sale the county recorder’s office, send a copy of the notice to the homeowner, and post the notice in a visible place on the property or serve the notice to the homeowner. The notice of sale will also be published in a local newspaper.

Washington Foreclosure Protections

Washington law provides protections in accordance with the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Washington law also provides protections to the National Guard or member of the military reserves.

Reinstatement and Redemption

In Washington, a homeowner can reinstate the loan at any time prior to the 11th day before the sale.

In Washington, a homeowner can’t redeem the home after a nonjuducial foreclosure.

Deficiency Law

In Washington, deficiency judgments are not allowed following nonjudicial foreclosures.

Eviction Notice

In Washington, the buyer is entitled to possession of the home on the 20th day after the foreclosure sale. If the foreclosed homeowners don’t leave, the buyer may file a lawsuit to evict them from the home. The buyer shall have a right to summary proceedings to obtain possession. For information regarding how to avoid foreclosure in Washington, visit HUD.gov.

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